Delivery

Winter Tips to Help Carriers Deliver Safely

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Ozone Park, NY Letter Carrier George Change is ready to make winter deliveries

 

It’s the time of the year when most Americans start paying a bit more attention to the weather to hear if Mother Nature is about to wreak havoc. Whether there is a minor dusting or significant accumulations, people flock to retailers to purchase water, milk, scrapers, shovels and snow blowers before they are sold out.

One constant you can rely on nearly every day is getting your mail. As a former letter carrier, I know there’s nothing worse than not being able to deliver your mail to you. Walking outside and keeping your balance on a winter’s day is challenging enough. Now envision adding 5, 10 or 20 or more pounds on your back and walking for hours. For driving routes, it’s also difficult driving to and from mailboxes surrounded by snow mounds.

Covelo, CA Rural Carrier Alesia Alvarez delivers in California snow

Although letter carriers are well versed in delivering in all types of weather and know how to exercise caution, here are a few tips to make their jobs easier:

– Clear a path or walkway to prevent possible slips and falls.

– Clear enough snow from curbside boxes for mail trucks to pull in, deliver the mail and pull out without having to back up.

– If your mailbox is attached to your house, please ensure your steps are as clear as possible.

Bedford Park, IL Tractor Trailer Operator John Peterson

The bottom line is when winter weather arrives, we all just want to be safe. Customers may visit the USPS Service Alerts page online to stay up-to-date on the latest operational alerts and we encourage our families and friends to exercise caution when we learn they will be going out in bad weather.

Here’s to keeping both you and our letter carriers safe, whether you’re going to the supermarket or to your mailbox.

 

 

 

Updated January 2018. Original post published on January 30, 2015.

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